Gums healthier in Roman Times

Gums healthier in Roman Times

Britons were more likely to hold on to their teeth in Roman times than they are today. According to a team at King’s College London and the National History Muesum people living in Roman Britain had healthier gums than their modern-day descendant.

Scientists found that gum disease was far less prevalent 1,800 years ago than it is in the modern age, despite the lack of toothbrushes and dentists.

The reason may be that people in Roman Britain did not smoke and were virtually free of diabetes, two health factors known to increase the risk of inflamed gums.

However Ancient Britain was certainly not a golden age of gleaming gnashers but littered with infections, abscesses and tooth decay.